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Equine

Select the links below to view the session details. Sessions will be updated as information becomes available.



Tuesday 19 June


In this hour I will discuss the reasons for developing a repository and some of the changes and improvements that have been made over time. In addition, I will cover methods to best utilize the digital software for reading radiographs, Differing methods of recording and communicating findings and the legal and ethical issues pertaining to the pre-purchase/sales radiology and how to avoid conflicts of interest.

I will discuss the common and not so common problems problems associated with feet and pastern joints. Australia and New Zealand are unique in that they are the only sales that require radiographs of the feet. They only require the lateral view and that can make interpretation difficult. I will discuss when can we be confident and where we should be cautious of over interpretation. The pastern joints are not the primary joint in the views, but we should be looking at the margins of the fetlock and feet radiographs to best make our interpretations on questions such as: What is normal for age? Is there a difference between fore and hind limbs? What is in the literature and how do we resolve the differences?

Acute hemorrhage associated with a variety of initiating causes from trauma to castration to parturition will be discussed. The focus of this lecture will be on controlling hemorrhage (when possible), assessing the cardiovascular status of the horse, and management including indications and methods for transfusion. Complications associated with transfusion and hemorrhage will be briefly described.

While the vast majority of horses with colic can be managed medically, early surgical intervention of a horse with a strangulating lesion is critical for a favorable outcome. The decision is not always easy! The focus of this lecture will be on assessment of the equine colic patient (including history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests) with regards for the decision for referral and surgery.

Palmar/plantar osteochondral disease - a diagnostic challenge | Jonathan Tam
Palmar/plantar osteochondral disease (POD) commonly affects Thoroughbreds, with studies showing that up to 80% can be affected. Without accurate diagnosis and management, POD can adversely affect a horse's racing career. A case of low grade plantar osteochondral disease will be discussed in this presentation to demonstrate the diagnostic challenge.

Standing flank laparoscopic-assisted removal of a 5kg granulosa cell tumour | Chris Riley
The removal of normal ovaries or moderately enlarged ovarian masses are routinely performed laparoscopically. Those >15cm in diameter may be problematic in the standing mare.  Pre-surgical considerations, the standing surgical removal and outcome for a mare with a massively enlarged ovarian mass are described.

A complicated case of metatarsophalangeal joint sepsis | Therese Ritson

Unilateral dacryohaemorrhea in a horse a case report | Elise Moritz

A bilateral testicular teratoma in a two-year-old clydesdale colt | Babiche Heil
The colt was presented with a growing unilateral scrotal enlargement. The scrotal testis was removed under general anaesthesia via a closed approach and the abdominal testis was removed via a right-sided standing exploratory laparotomy. On histology both were identified as teratomas.

Ureteral tear in a two-month old filly | Jenny Sonis

Laryngeal ultrasound in yearling thoroughbreds with two year old follow up | Barbara Hunter
The echogenicity of the left cricoarytenoideus lateralis muscle was assessed in concert with left arytenoid function grade in normal Thoroughbred yearlings. These same Thoroughbreds were re-assessed as two year olds in work.

Failure to finish a race and catastrophic musculoskeletal injuries in New Zealand | Chris Rogers
Musculoskeletal injury (MSI) is the major contributor to wastage across all racing jurisdictions.  The rate of MSI and failure to finish within New Zealand flat racing appears low compared to other countries.  This presentation looks at the current injury rates and features of New Zealand racing that may be associated with lower injury rates.

Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus in New Zealand horses | Olivia Patty
Although S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) is considered an opportunistic, secondary pathogen, some isolates of this microorganism appear to be the primary pathogen in horse uterine or respiratory disease. This research aims to enhance our understanding of S. zooepidemicus within the New Zealand horse population by investigating strain genomics and phenotypic characteristics associated with disease.

The effect of in vitro activation of equine mesenchymal stromal cells and dermal fibroblasts on their cytokine profile | Alex Leander

Injuries to horses associated with road transport in New Zealand | Chris Riley
Horses transported for commercial and non-commercial purposes are at significant risk of injury, health, and welfare compromise. This paper describes the findings of an industry wide survey of New Zealand horse owners regarding their road transport practices in the risk of injury to horses associated with this common management activity.

Leptospira seroprevalence in broodmares and racehorses in New Zealand | Erica Gee
Leptospirosis is uncommon in horses in NZ, but may cause abortion and recurrent uveitis. The seroprevalence of 500 racehorses and broodmares to five different serovars showed that 25% of horses were positive to at least one serovar. Odds of positive results increased with age, in broodmares, and when grazed with sheep.

The effects of nanoparticle semen purification on semen quality parameters in stallions | Lee Morris

Molecular approaches for the detection of pathogens in horses | Emily Grout

Preliminary findings of distal extremity contrast enhanced computed tomography in the horse: 68 cases | Fred Pauwels

This talk summarises a project to job-size vets in a structured and analytical process to define what positions of similar training, responsibility etc are paid.

Complimentary. Limited to 50 people.


Wednesday 20 June


A hodgepodge of questions we all ask about our neuro cases in Aotearoa. Such cases include suspected seizures, ryegrass staggers, stringhalt, shivers, wobblers, EHV-1, tics, Horner’s syndrome and head and neck trauma. We will try to suggest an initial approach for diagnosis and comment on do’s and don’ts regarding therapy and prognosis.

A hodgepodge of questions we all ask about our neuro cases in Aotearoa. Such cases include suspected seizures, ryegrass staggers, stringhalt, shivers, wobblers, EHV-1, tics, Horner’s syndrome and head and neck trauma. We will try to suggest an initial approach for diagnosis and comment on do’s and don’ts regarding therapy and prognosis.

The fetlock joints are high motion joints which act as shock absorbers. They are frequently a cause for lameness resulting in decreased performance. This joint also suffers from more injury as young foals than other joints which creates confusion regarding risk assessment. There are four major radiographic abnormalities that can affect the sale of yearlings. Two of these involve the fetlock joint. I will discuss these varying issues.

The fetlock joints are high motion joints which act as shock absorbers. They are frequently a cause for lameness resulting in decreased performance. This joint also suffers from more injury as young foals than other joints which creates confusion regarding risk assessment. There are four major radiographic abnormalities that can affect the sale of yearlings. Two of these involve the fetlock joint. I will discuss these varying issues.

The One Health concept is unifying and inspiring. Networks, consortia, initiatives and commissions have been formed with a One Health brief, and there has been a veritable explosion of activity associated with the term. The concept of interconnectedness of the health and wellbeing of living things on the planet is intuitively understandable and has been promoted over a long period.

Understanding what good animal welfare is and how it can be assessed across a range of environments must be a key priority for ensuring the health and welfare of animals in their association with humans. Until recently animal welfare assessment traditionally relied on measures of physical health, and changes in behaviour and physiology related to negative emotional states such as pain and stress. We now recognize that good welfare is not simply the absence of disease or negative experiences, but also the possibility for, and presence of, positive emotional experiences such as pleasure and even happiness. To ensure that an animal’s welfare needs are met, we need to develop reliable methods for recognizing and assessing the range of animal emotions, as well as judge their importance from the animal’s point of view.

This paper is a worldwide first presenting the key personality characteristics of veterinarians who have proved themselves job fit by surviving more than 30 years in clinical practice. It is suggested that such evidence will better inform the process of selection for admission to veterinary school.

Members of the NZVA and VPIS are encouraged to attend.

Antimicrobial drugs have had an insurmountable positive impact on infection management and surgical outcome. That being said, antimicrobial drug resistance, cost of patient care, and antimicrobial-associated complications are problems facing the veterinary profession in the 21st century. The focus of this lecture will be on responsible use of prophylactic and therapeutic antimicrobials in equine practice.

Horses with proximal enteritis (duodenitis-proximal jejunitis) and ileus can be challenging to manage for several reasons. This lecture will focus on the non-surgical diagnosis of horses with reflux, fluid and electrolyte therapy, and the use of promotility drugs.


Thursday 21 June


Assessment of the horse presenting on an emergency basis with respiratory distress will be described. A step-by-step description of how to perform a temporary tracheostomy including methods to prevent common complications will be given. Other procedures including transtracheal wash and chest tube placement for pneumothorax and pleural effusing will be explained in detail.

Impactions are a common cause of equine colic. Large colon impactions at the pelvic flexure are easily the most common and are usually managed medically; however, impactions can occur almost anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract. Management of impactions from the esophagus (choke) to the small colon and rectum will be described with a focus on medical v. surgical management for a successful outcome.

Both the tarsus and carpus have a multitude of bones and ligaments which leads to varying mechanical movements. The mechanical movement results in repetitive loads as well as the potential for hyper extension. The radiographic changes typically occur in very repeatable locations making accurate positioning very important. The tarsus, like the fetlock, is vulnerable as a foal which can lead to early developmental abnormalities. Both joints are potentially difficult to evaluate because of the multiple lines. I will discuss abnormal looking normalities. The tarsus is also a sight for OCD development. We will discuss which of these are most likely to require surgical intervention. The stifle is truly a complex joint which continues to mature well after the yearling year. Like the hock, OCD lesions frequently develop in stifles, but unlike the hock the OCD lesions of the stifle can develop later than other locations. With the complexity of this joint, what information is useful in making accurate risk assessments? It is also a joint that hides some very complex lesions.

The lecture will include insights to what is next for repositories and pre-purchase examinations. How can we more accurately make risk assessments? What new diagnostic test may be integrated into examinations? How do we maintain integrity to the repository and the profession? How do we acquire additional views if needed? How can we best assist vendors in producing a better product?

The Professional Veterinary Insurance Society (VPIS) plays a vital role in helping veterinarians through dealing with complaints lodged for breach of professional duty as well as in assisting them through regulatory hearings from the VCNZ or racing authorities. This paper deals with some examples of equine related claims and the more general topic of handling regulatory charges.

A brief description of the formulation of antimicrobial guidelines combined with how resistance occurs, the ramifications and some peculiar prescribing intricacies of equine medicine. Included are comments on appropriate antimicrobial use.

The Gouldie Hour was initiated at the 2013 NZEVA Conference to recognise the considerable contribution made by Dr Brian Goulden to education and to continuing equine veterinary education in New Zealand. In continued celebration of Dr Brian Goulden’s superb contributions to equine veterinary science, Louise Southwood and Joe Mayhew will attempt to titillate, annoy, stimulate, entertain, challenge and hopefully edify colleagues on papers and issues from the current equine veterinary literature. A bit of science, a bit of blarney, a bit of wrangling, but surely no scepticism?

Members of the New Zealand Equine Veterinary Association of the NZVA are encouraged to attend.

Tickets cost $120 - includes transportation, dinner, drinks and a band.

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