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Dairy Cattle Veterinarians (in date and time order)

 

Presented by Katrina Roberts and others

Summary to come.

Presented by Chris Riley

Perioperative pain management and infection prevention

The management of pain in food animals has become even more important as our understanding of sentience and animal welfare regulations have progressed. This session will cover the spectrum of options including pre-, intra- and post- operative analgesia including sedation, regional anaesthesia, and NSAID's (including topical flunixin). Surgical site infection is another challenge in field surgery that often results in morbidity, increased expenses and mortality. We will discuss the limited information available for cattle on infection rates, and the fundamental approaches to minimising the risk of infection, and minimising our reliance upon antibiotics in the face of prudent use guidelines.

Gassy guts - surgical management of LDA's, RDA's and caecal disorders

Gas pings, flank distension, ileus, and signs of abdominal pain often lead to exploratory flank laparotomy. This approach allows for a definitive diagnosis, and in many cases resolution of the "gassy guts". The session will focus on surgically exploring the bovine abdomen, and the assessment and correction those disorders affecting the abomasum and caecum, briefly touching on small intestinal complaints. In the case of the right displaced abomasum, there are many approaches and we will discuss some of the benefits and limitations of each of these.

Calf surgery - the infected umbilicus, persistent urachus, bladder rupture and hernias

The umbilicus is a common source of problems in the neonatal calf, that in some cases persist as they develop into young stock. Whereas in the past we have relied upon long-term use of antibiotics to correct some of these, surgical correction often results in a more speedy recovery, and prevention of more serious sequelae such as joint ill or intestinal adhesions. An understanding of the perinatal umbilical anatomy greatly facilitates the surgical resolution of a number of complaints. We will discuss the assessment of and different surgical approaches to the management of umbilical conditions including hernias.

Rapid round-up - C-section tips and tricky teat surgery

So much surgery - so little time. If you have less experience with the bovine C-section or are in need of a refresher, and perhaps a few tips and insights that we can all share with each other, we will discuss some of the practical considerations of performing the procedure quickly in the field. For those valuable dairy cows that require surgery of the teat, we will also discuss advanced approaches to evaluation and surgical management of the more common conditions.

Presented by Cord Heuer & Yuni Yupiana

A cross sectional study was conducted from January - April 2016 to investigate shedding and sero-prevalence of Leptospira in dairy cattle in New Zealand. In total 4000 paired blood and urine samples from milking cows and 200 bulk milk samples were collected from 200 randomly selected dairy farms. Overall, 2.4% cows and 26.5% farms were urine PCR positive for Leptospira DNA, 62.6% cows were serologically positive to at least one serovar (Hardjobovis, Pomona, Copenhageni, Tarassovi and Ballum) and 97.5% bulk milk samples were ELISA positives. While vaccination protected against shedding, the non-vaccine serovar Tarassovi was strongly associated with shedding, was found in 17% of cows, and appears to have found a reservoir in cattle.

Presented by Marie Moinet

The risk of Leptospira transmission to humans from domestic species in New Zealand is reasonably well understood, but there is a dearth of current information about wildlife-related serovars. We conducted a cross-sectional study in the Manawatu-Whanganui region to identify serovars present in wildlife and livestock and will present interim results.

Presented by Kathryn Allan

Leptospirosis is an important and widespread zoonotic infection. Worldwide, livestock keepers and agricultural workers are at risk of disease through contact with infected livestock. However, leptospirosis is a complex disease; globally, more than 250 serovars of Leptospira have been identified in association with a wide range of animal hosts. This presentation will provide an overview of livestock-associated leptospirosis in people including risk factors for human disease, approaches for identifying animal sources of infection and challenges for leptospirosis control from a public health perspective.

Presented by Scott McDougall

The NZVA and DCV have taken a leadership role in antimicrobial stewardship. In 2016, an aspirational goal was announced of only using antibiotics at the end of lactation in infected cows. Hence data will be provided on selection of cows and effect of internal teat sealants under New Zealand conditions.

Presented by John Howie & Ryan Luckman

Summary to come.

Presented by Wayne Ricketts

Summary to come.

Presented by Awilda Baoumgren

Summary to come.

Presented by Richard Tiddy

Summary to come.

Presented by Steve Cranefield

The veterinary professional insurance society (VPIS) provide indemnity insurance to the New Zealand Veterinary Profession. Two recent areas of concern for veterinarians have been changes to NZCP-1 "operation of farm dairies" and the NZVA/DCV recommendations around prescribing under AMR. Veterinarians have sought advice from VPIS as to whether they have insurance cover in situations where clinical practice and industry regulations are at odds. This paper will cover the VPIS recommendations on these issues and highlight common areas of risk for dairy cattle veterinarians in this changing regulatory environment.

Presented by Emma Cuttance

The work today summarises a part of the wider study looking at calf and replacement heifer mortality up until weaning.

Presented by Lisa Bickner and Richard Laven

The aim of this talk on pain relief in calves at disbudding will be to briefly outline (1) new legislation that will be coming into action next year on pain relief being used for calf disbudding to ensure everyone is on the same page; (2) what the options are for pain relief and who can use them; (3) recent studies on pain relief use in calves at disbudding and the evidence for using it; (4) the benefits of pain relief according to the technicians and farmers; (5) any problems associated with the use of pain relief.

Presented by Fanny Leduc

This is a case report about an outbreak of abomasal bloat in a group of autumn-born dairy x beef calves fed milk powder. Presenting sings, gross post-mortem findings and applied treatment protocol is described. A brief explanation of the possible causes and pathology are provided, as well as a brief description of the author's experience in filing and adverse event report with MPI.

Presented by John O'Connell

Summary to come.

Presented by Amy Watts

p>In the spring of 2016, two separate herds in the Waikato region were each found to have a widespread mastitis infection with the algae "Prototheca". Despite being widespread in the environment, protothecal infection is an uncommon cause of elevated somatic cell counts and mastitis in dairy cattle in New Zealand, and reports of mastitis outbreaks are rare. As protothecal infection is very difficult to treat, and spontaneous cure rates are low, case management in an outbreak situation is very challenging. Due to financial considerations each of the two farms were managed differently, providing insight into the options available to veterinarians faced with this challenging disease.

 

Presented by Rachel Numan & Steve Cranefield

Summary to come.

Presented by Mick Clews

Summary to come.

Presented by Laura Beasley

This presentation is designed as an introduction to the DCV milk quality consult tool, including a guide to operating the tool and suggestions for integrating it into your milk quality consult process. This tool has been released as part of DCV's focus on responsible use of antimicrobials; antibiotic dry cow therapy is a huge contributor to overall antimicrobial usage in production animals and its usage will come under increasing scrutiny.

Presented by Mick Clews

Summary to come.

Presented by Georgette Wouda

Housing cows in New Zealand (seasonal or whole year round) is not a new concept but something that is steadily growing, in particular in the southern regions of the country. As veterinarians we therefore might encounter questions by our farming clients regarding preferred design options, potential (health and welfare) challenges etc. This talk outlines some of the resource materials available to rural professionals regarding cow housing, an update on welfare regulations, the most commonly seen challenges that vets might encounter when dealing with farms that have got barn facilities and some of the opportunities that housing cows will create for both farmer and vet.

Presented by David Johnston

The presentation will outline a farmer's thoughts towards the integration and management of a cow housing system into the tradition grass grazing system so prevalent in New Zealand. Outlining when and how the barn is used, what we feed and the different daily tasks needed to keep it running successfully. Also, what are the benefits and challenges of utilising a cow barn to the farm system? What have we learned and what would we do different in designing the next one.

Presented by Trish McIntosh

Summary to come.

Presented by Neil Chesterton

Summary to come.

Presented by Katie Saunders

The goal of this presentation is to renew your enthusiasm for addressing dairy cow lameness. What is the current situation in NZ? Where are we heading? What have DairyNZ got to offer? Including an exciting new app and some tips and tricks from the Lameness Technical Advisory Group.

Presented by DairyNZ

Summary to come.

Presented by Andy McFadden & Merlyn Hay

In July 2017 an unusual pattern of foreleg lameness and non responsive mastitis was noted in a 1300 cow milking herd in South Canterbury. Consequent work up and investigation led to a diagnosis of Mycoplasma bovis. Despite being common world wide this was the first time that this disease has been diagnosed in New Zealand.

 

Large Animal Veterinary Technicians (in date and time order)

Presented by Cord Heuer & Yuni Yupiana

A cross sectional study was conducted from January - April 2016 to investigate shedding and sero-prevalence of Leptospira in dairy cattle in New Zealand. In total 4000 paired blood and urine samples from milking cows and 200 bulk milk samples were collected from 200 randomly selected dairy farms. Overall, 2.4% cows and 26.5% farms were urine PCR positive for Leptospira DNA, 62.6% cows were serologically positive to at least one serovar (Hardjobovis, Pomona, Copenhageni, Tarassovi and Ballum) and 97.5% bulk milk samples were ELISA positives. While vaccination protected against shedding, the non-vaccine serovar Tarassovi was strongly associated with shedding, was found in 17% of cows, and appears to have found a reservoir in cattle.

Presented by Marie Moinet

The risk of Leptospira transmission to humans from domestic species in New Zealand is reasonably well understood, but there is a dearth of current information about wildlife-related serovars. We conducted a cross-sectional study in the Manawatu-Whanganui region to identify serovars present in wildlife and livestock and will present interim results.

Presented by Kathryn Allan

Leptospirosis is an important and widespread zoonotic infection. Worldwide, livestock keepers and agricultural workers are at risk of disease through contact with infected livestock. However, leptospirosis is a complex disease; globally, more than 250 serovars of Leptospira have been identified in association with a wide range of animal hosts. This presentation will provide an overview of livestock-associated leptospirosis in people including risk factors for human disease, approaches for identifying animal sources of infection and challenges for leptospirosis control from a public health perspective.

Presented by Scott McDougall

The NZVA and DCV have taken a leadership role in antimicrobial stewardship. In 2016, an aspirational goal was announced of only using antibiotics at the end of lactation in infected cows. Hence data will be provided on selection of cows and effect of internal teat sealants under New Zealand conditions.

Presented by John Howie & Ryan Luckman

Summary to come.

Presented by Wayne Clough

Summary to come.

Presented by Abi Chase

Summary to come.

Presented by Emma Cuttance

The work today summarises a part of the wider study looking at calf and replacement heifer mortality up until weaning.

Presented by Lisa Bickner and Richard Laven

The aim of this talk on pain relief in calves at disbudding will be to briefly outline (1) new legislation that will be coming into action next year on pain relief being used for calf disbudding to ensure everyone is on the same page; (2) what the options are for pain relief and who can use them; (3) recent studies on pain relief use in calves at disbudding and the evidence for using it; (4) the benefits of pain relief according to the technicians and farmers; (5) any problems associated with the use of pain relief.

Presented by Keryn Cresswell

There are many small-holder dairy farms in Sri Lanka (< 20 cows), but the profitability of these farms is often questionable. The Sri Lanka Dairy Excellence Training Initiative is a NZ Aid project intended to improve the profitability of such farms, and the lifestyle of the families that run them.

Presented by Emma Cuttance

The work today summarises part of the wider study on failure of passive transfer - testing, prevalence, risk factors and effects as well as the results from the work Katie Denholm did that dove tailed into this project on colostrum quality.

Presented by Greg Chambers & Kristen Baxter

Latest information on how technician teams can maximise the effectiveness and minimise the risks associated with treating heifers and cows with intramammary products. Why treating cows with internal teat sealants alone is growing, how farms and cows are selected and what to expect. A look at the future of large animal veterinary technician work and how technology and society might change what technicians do in the mastitis field.

Presented by Steve Cranefield

Early diagnosis and treatment of endometritis improves herd reproductive performance. This interactive workshop covers the latest work on endometritis and includes a practical session on how to metricheck cows and how to pass intra-uterine pipettes. Training aids will include videos and bovine models so you can give it a go!

Presented by Renee Lodder

Summary to come.

NZVA

The conference is organised and hosted by the New Zealand Veterinary Association.

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